Discuss Amongst Yourselves:

Added on by Roxana Alger Geffen.

"Kahn’s paintings thoroughly integrate pictorial space with that of the object. Each shape within the composition is the shape it is, but it also depicts the shape it is. Each finished abstract work acts simultaneously as a relief object and an image."

Re. Wyatt Kahn at the Sculpture Center

 

Still  , 2013. Canvas on canvas on panel. 91 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Eva Presenhuber. Photo by Genevieve Hanson.  

Still, 2013. Canvas on canvas on panel. 91 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Eva Presenhuber. Photo by Genevieve Hanson.  

James Hyde!

Added on by Roxana Alger Geffen.

These paintings from his show at the Mason Gross Gallery are energetic, powerful, bold and surprisingly touching in their thoughtful engagement with the work of Stuart Davis. I wish I'd been able to see them in person.

Also beautiful are his paintings on porcelain: 
(apologies for the image quality: go to his site to see it properly)

"Breeze" 2002-2011  vinyl paint on archival inkjet print on glazed porcelain, 10 x 10.5 inches

"Breeze" 2002-2011 vinyl paint on archival inkjet print on glazed porcelain, 10 x 10.5 inches

 

 

Vermont Studio Center rocked my world

Added on by Roxana Alger Geffen.

Returning home from the VSC is a little like stumbling out of the exit door of a club at the end of the night: exchanging, in an instant, the noise, heat, thump and electricity of the dance floor for the cold, casual blankness of the late-night street. Sometimes the silence + space are a relief. This time, though, not so much. 

 

Next door (evening in Johnson, VT)

Next door (evening in Johnson, VT)

Arlington

Added on by Roxana Alger Geffen.

I'm still finding my way around Arlington, and every once in a while I discover something great.  Arlington reminds me of Wellington, New Zealand, a city I lived in for about 8 months in 2003. Wellington was a well-behaved small city, respectable and suburban, but also willing to embrace its urban side. When I was there Wellington had put out an open call to the hip and cool: new coffee shops and pop-up galleries were sprouting all over the city, breaking up the more sedate facades of a bureaucratic capitol. The hipsters--as hipsters will--were studiously avoiding the bland office buildings built to tempt international do-gooders and businesses, instead seizing on whatever remained of Wellington's even older, frontier past. A bank built to protect gold-rush bonanzas became an amazing new restaurant. Peter Jackson revived the old movie theatre for the world premieres of The Lord of the Rings movies. So, too, in Arlington, VA. Traces of the 1950s and 60s stand fast next to stands of fast-growing office space, sometimes embraced and celebrated by the art crowd, sometimes ignored by everyone.

An amazing example of this--manifestly celebrated--is Ben Fehrmann's installation at the Clarendon's power substation. 

 

More about this project can be found at the Arlington Arts site:

http://www.arlingtonarts.org/cultural-affairs/public-art-in-arlington/recent-and-upcoming-projects.aspx